Friday, November 5, 2010

Learning through Art: HIV/AIDS in Film--Pills Profits Protest: Voices of Global AIDS Activists

Here's my review of an older AIDS-related documentary--Pills Profits Protest: Voices of Global AIDS Activists, co-directed by Ann-christine d'Adesky and Ann T. Rosetti, whom I had the honor to meet in person.  Looking at today's AIDS activists and activism, sometimes I wonder how much they have changed in not even a decade... The film review was originally published in A&U Magazine--America's AIDS Magazine.

As always, thanks for visiting,
Alina Oswald
Author of Journeys Through Darkness
www.alina-arts.com



Pills Profits Protest: Voices of Global AIDS Activists
Co-directed by Ann-christine d'Adesky and Ann T. Rossetti
September 2003

Reviewed by Alina Oswald

Pills Profits Protest is an up-to-the-minute chronicle of global AIDS treatment access movement that weaves personal battles with HIV/AIDS, stories of activism against AIDS and the big pharmaceutical companies from around the world, with opinions of politicians, journalists, doctors and members of national and international organizations.    
Co-directed by Ann-christine d'Adesky, an AIDS journalist since 1984, the one-hour documentary "was made in fits and starts," as Ms. d'Adesky explains, in a two-year timeframe-from the AIDS conference in Durban, South Africa, in the summer of 2000, an event that "turned despair into hope," to Brazil, in 2002.  Along the way, documented stories from India, Haiti and Uganda added to the film's message...that it is easy to mobilize people to fight against AIDS and for their rights to treatment and this fight takes different paths in different countries. 
Especially in poor and developing countries, people "on the ground"-those who are affected by the disease first hand-cannot afford the exorbitant prices of the Western drugs.  Result?  They develop not only their own generic medications but also their own survival strategies.  
For example, Brazilian health representatives believe that "until not long ago HIV affected the [human] body in the same way AIDS affected the world."  Nowadays, all Brazilian people living with HIV/AIDS have access to generic AIDS medications and treatment.  India first got into the game in order to provide Brazilians with cheaper drugs... nowadays, it develops its own.  In developing countries, providing treatment and care for people living with HIV/AIDS is not a health issue, but an economical issue.  Even more, in African countries, the fight for access to AIDS treatment for all translates into a women's movement for their rights and for the rights of children and orphans. 
The global fight against the high Western AIDS treatment prices follows the diversity of the global fight against AIDS.  Globally, there is a huge "gap between what people want and what the government thinks it's good for the people," a gap that the Global Fund Organization many hope is capable to bridge.  As of summer of 2001 the Fund was "half billion dollars and growing," as Collin Powel announced at the UN conference, while AIDS activists demonstrated inside the UN building. 
So, is there any hope that this bridge will ever be built?  After watching Pills Profits Protest we surely hope so, or at least agree with Rachel Cohen's (Doctors without Borders) beliefs that the global movement for AIDS treatment for all may start another research revolution.  Pills Profits Protest reaches for the hope still present in our hearts, an enthusiastic approach to inform and educate about the reality of the global fight against AIDS through the fight for available treatment for all.

No comments:

Post a Comment